Your Projects

Dr. Rekha Sharma of Nottingham UK writes, “I first bought a Petite Plus Pattern for the Tapered Pull on Pant. It fit so well I followed the author, Kathleen Cheetham, to her two classes on Craftsy. It was with relief and confidence I cut the pattern for my Happy Shirt, #104 Shapely Shirt.

“Unlike other patterns I have bought, I didn’t need to make any changes in Kathleen’s pattern. What’s more the darts sat where they should; I normally have them coming up and past the bust point.”

Thank you for sharing. We love your choice of prints and colors!

 

Nancy Olson made this Zip Front Jacket #201 and calls it her Paris Jacket.
She says, “What a great pattern…I have plans to use it over and again. Also, I am using the Jeans pattern to make a pair of trousers (no back pockets) to go with the Paris Zip jacket in a black twill. My goal is to make every one of your patterns…thank you for designing and giving us these wonderful patterns.”

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

   
I made the Swing Coat in zebra rain wear 2 times, one for the Fabric of Vision which led to making an exact copy for a client as well. The directions were superb, (especially the welt pockets), notches great, and a cool result even though it requires only 15 yards of homemade piping! My client needed 2 layers of shoulder pads as some of us petite girls were not blessed with good shoulders…actually sloping narrow shoulders is more the norm!
Jo Ann Beroiz Ely of Medford, OR

Save

 Jo Ann Beroiz Ely of Medford OR is an exquisite seamstress who among other things makes samples for Fabrics of Vision in Ashland. She made our Jeans Jacket #204 in Stretch Corduroy and sent us these photos.

Jo Ann wrote, “Your patterns are made so well with divine instructions!”
This fabric was stretch corduroy and it went together well except for the fact near the lower front band part of the pocket is included inside so the snaps even though they were long prong type from Snap Source they struggled a bit to grab on through all the thicknesses. If I made this jacket again I would reduce the bulk in that area if snaps were going to be used for closures. Also, if using such a thick fabric again I would plan ahead to use a thinner fabric like quilting cotton for the under flap of the pocket flap, under collar, inside pocket and maybe make a facing for those front bands by slicing them in half lengthwise and adding a vertical seam allowance so the new band facing could be thinner too and be seen as most of use rarely button or snap up a jean jacket.

There are so many things to do with such a versatile pattern. I would even use different darker fabrics to narrow my body on the side panels and piping is always cool too. The fact that all the seams are double topstitched is lost on this fabric and they would certainly show up better on a solid. The back yoke and lower panel seemed wide on some of my clients who tried it on but if it is meant to be worn over a hoodie then you would need the extra room. Your patterns work well, have precise notches (thank you!) and great directions.
The only recommendation I would have is at the end when stitching the lower band on. You have the center front seam sewn first and then attached to the jacket. This leaves a lump to wrestle with right at that point. If the band was sewn on first and then that small vertical center front seam sewn on the band and trimmed and flipped inside it might lie flatter but I was working with a thick fabric.

Save

Save

Save

Denise Severson is a talented seamstress from Janesville WI. Denise made our #251 Walking Jacket in a reversible sweater knit.
The double-sided fabric presented a number of challenges so Denise implemented techniques from #2013, Cheri’s Reversible Jacket – a pattern from our IPCA pal Marsha McClintock’s Safety Pockets line.
Denise used a salt and pepper sweater knit on side 1, bonded to a black windproof fleece on side 2. She was not only short on fabric but also had to deal with a flaw on the black side in a bad spot. She “pieced” some areas and made fabric saving changes in other places.
* Front and neck facings eliminated to reduce bulk
* hood zipper guard eliminated to reduce bulk (also, otherwise I would surely lose the hood-done that before!) and hood is permanently attached to jacket
* center panel on hood eliminated and hood redrafted (to work around the flaw)
* side 1 has invisible zippers at princess seams to allow pocket opening
* side 2 has patch pockets, they secure with Velcro (it doesn’t catch on the fleece side)
* zipper eliminated (fabric too bulky) and Velcro eliminated (snagged sweater knit) and closures replaced with swivel head lobster claws. Coat is shown pulled slightly open to reveal the closures. Buttons not used because the sweater knit didn’t lend itself well to buttonholes
* tabs eliminated on sleeve cuffs to reduce bulk on sleeve (plus, I usually wear hefty mittens)
* side 2 black side has a faced hem. (Who wants a wide white contrasting horizontal stripe at the hips?)
* all edges are serged to finish and, where possible, seams are slightly offset to simulate a graded seam allowance to reduce bulk, then topstitched. The black side shows wisps of white along the seams; the sweater side had nearly invisible seams.
Beautiful work Denise!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Denise Severson was a finalist in the 2012 IPCA Midnight Magic Contest and made wearable art with our All Season Dress #303.
Take note when you look at the photos that this is one dress, not two!
Denise made several changes to the pattern for this completely reversible dress.
Front and back were cut from prepared herringbone panels. They were seamed on the lengthwise grain but cut on point. Denise says the resulting bias allows for an easier fit on a slim dress.
Denise merged the two-piece sleeves into a ¾-length one-piece, then she cut it on the bias to fit a full upper arm.
The boat neckline was converted to a v-neck to compliment the herringbone.
To accommodate the fabric insets, the back kick pleats and centre back zip were eliminated and the side bodice and side skirt were merged.
Denise installed camouflaged side zips so that the dress could be opened from the left no matter which side faced out.
Seam allowances were increased to allow for turned, top-stitched and flat-felled seams. Denise used contrast thread for her topstitching.
At the neckline facing and hem, Denise finished with bias binding.
Beautiful job, Denise! Thanks for letting us share your artistry with other creative sewing enthusiasts.

Save

Save

Jeans Jacket #205 by Shari Adams
Jeans Jacket #205 by Shari Adams
“Have gotten lots of compliments on the Yoked Blouse.”

Shari Adams writes, “I did a full bust adjustment for my DD bust and moved the dart to the yoke gathers. Also, I lengthened the torso, since I’m 5′ 8”. With the striped fabric, I didn’t notice until the collar was complete that it was an unbalanced stripe, so I appliqued the “correct” stripes in the proper places!”

Nice work Shari!

Here is Shari AdamsJeans Jacket in a sturdy cotton twill. Love the color on you Shari!
Shari cut a size 22, increased the bust fullness for her DD cup and lengthened 3 inches based on her back waist length. (Shari’s one of our taller customers.)
Shari was initially concerned about the full fit of the jeans jacket across the back and in the sleeve. We reminded her that the jeans jacket is meant to be over-sized to allow for a bulky sweater or hoodie beneath. If you want a closer fitting jeans jacket, consider cutting down one size.

Save

Save

Save

Wendy Hays of Idaho Falls ID writes, “I just wanted to thank you for Petite Plus Patterns. They have been so wonderful to work with, and have saved me literally weeks of fitting time.

I am enclosing a picture of a suit I made using Pattern Princess Seamed Blazer. It fit like a dream with very little altering once the pattern was cut from the fabric.

Many thanks, Wendy”

Save

Save

Save

Judy Franck of Penticton BC makes beautiful sleep wear. Here are two photos she sent of #401 Nightgown PJ’s  made with inlaid lace and embroidery on satin. Beautiful work  Judy! Thanks for sharing.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save